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Defining FR – Flame Resistant Fabrics (Jul/Aug-11)
OSHA's Flammable & Combustible Liquids (May/Jun-11)
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OSHA Is My Friend (Nov/Dec-10)
OSHA Standard for Control of Hazardous Energy Sources? (Sep/Oct-10)
Lockout/Tagout Program (Jul/Aug-10)
Safe Handling of Compressed Gas Cylinders (May/Jun-10)
What You Should Know about OSHA and Plastic Working Machinery (Mar/Apr-10)
Fasten Those Forklift Seat Belts (Jan/Feb-10)
My Back Hurts (Nov/Dec-09)
Fall Protection Program (Sep/Oct-09)
Accident Prevention & Investigation (Jul/Aug-09)
OSHA & Machine Safeguarding (May/Jun-09)
Carbon Monoxide Hazards (Mar/Apr-09)
OSHA Electrical Safety and Training (Jan/Feb-09)
Free Forklift ANSI Standards (Nov/Dec-08)
Worksite Fire Emergencies (Sep/Oct-08)
Machine Safety (Jul/Aug-08)
Ladder Safety (May/Jun-08)
Is Your Company on OSHA's Hit List?
OSHA Notifies Workplaces with High Injury and Illness Rates (Mar/Apr-08)
Safety Means . . . Never Having to Say You're Sorry (Jan/Feb-08)
Flammables and Combustible Liquids (Nov/Dec-07)
Designing-In Safety NOT Retrofitting Safety (Sep/Oct-07)
Back Safety and Lifting (Jul/Aug-07)
Machine Guarding (May/Jun-07)
Your Hearing Keep it for a Lifetime (Mar/Apr-07)
Light Up the Holidays the Safe Way (Nov/Dec-06)
Would You Risk Your Employee's Life? (Sep/Oct-06)
How to Control Workers' Compensation Costs (Jul/Aug-06)
Compliance with 70E Electrical Standards (May/Jun-06)
OSHA Is on the Move (Mar/Apr-06)
Workplace Violence (Jan/Feb-06)
The Aging Workforce (Nov/Dec-05)
The Safety Paradox (Sep/Oct-05)
Machine Guarding (Jul/Aug-05)
Effective Risk Management (May/Jun-05)
Safety Is Everyone's Business (Mar/Apr-05)
New Year's Resolution Safety (Jan/Feb-05)
Safe Driving (Nov/Dec-04)
Terror In The Skies Revisited (Sep/Oct-04)
How They Got Hurt (Jul/Aug-04)
In-Plant Air Monitoring & Analysis (May/Jun-04)
Safety on the Job and Complying with the Americans With Disabilities Act (Mar/Apr-04)
Link to Article Archive (Jan/Feb-04)
A Supervisor's Duty (Nov/Dec-03)
Machine Safety – Are Your Machines Safe to Operate? (Sep/Oct-03)
Summer is Here (Jul/Aug-03)
Working Safely On Powered Industrial Trucks (Forklifts) (May/Jun-03)
Does Your Safety and Health Workplace Program Contain All of These Elements? (Mar/Apr-03)
Methylene Chloride (Jan/Feb-03)
Safety Signs & Labels - Does Your Facility Comply? (Nov/Dec-02)
Indoor Air Quality (Sep/Oct-02)
When OSHA Arrives (Jul/Aug-02)
Facts About the Occupation Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) (May/Jun-02)
Workplace Fire Safety (Mar/Apr-02)
OSHA 300 Form (Jan/Feb-02)
Preparing for Disaster (Nov/Dec-01)
How Much is a Life Worth? (Sep/Oct-01)
Material Handling Programs (Jul/Aug-01)
It's Up To You To Protect Your Skin (May/Jun-01)
When You’ve Been Handed the Responsibility for Safety (Mar/Apr-01)
A Fresh Look at Machine Safeguarding (Jan/Feb-01)
Safe Work Habits (Nov/Dec-00)
The Importance of Material Safety Data Sheets (Sep/Oct-00)
Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (Jul/Aug-00)
Lockout/Tagout Program (May/Jun-00)
OSHA Violations, Citations and Penalties for 1998 (Mar/Apr-00)
Erogonomics and Machinery Safeguarding (Jan/Feb-00)
General Machine Principles (Nov/Dec-99)
SAFETY SOLUTIONS
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SAFETY SOLUTIONS: Free Forklift ANSI Standards

Recently while I was teaching a Forklift Train-The- Trainer class at the OSHA Training Institutes, I was asked by one of the students where they could get the ANSI standards.

I was explaining that most companies forklift programs do not really meet OSHA requirements since OSHA has adopted the American National Standards Institute in both the general industry and construction standards. I went onto the internet and I had a pleasant surprise.

First, for those not familiar with materials handling entities in the US, the Industrial Truck Association (ITA) is made up of representatives from major forklift manufacturers and other interested parties and promotes materials handling and safety. The ITA was a driving force behind changes in the OSHA forklift standard of the late 1990s after many years of effort and urging. Besides the OSHA standard, most forklift trainers are familiar with the ANSI or ASME standard (different names for the same standard).

American National Standards Institute (ANSI B56.1) forklift standard has been referenced by OSHA in their standards. For example, 29 CFR 1910.6 Incorporated by Reference states” 1910.6(a)(1) The standards of agencies of the U.S. Government, and organizations which are not agencies of the U.S. Government which are incorporated by reference in this part, have the same force and effect as other standards in this part. Only the mandatory provisions of standards incorporated by reference are adopted as standards under the Occupational Safety and Health Act.

Forklifts are also referenced under OSHA 1910.6(e)(29) ANSI B56.1-69 Safety Standard for Powered Industrial Trucks, IBR approved for §§1910.178(a)(2) and (3) and 1910.261(a)(3)(xv), (b)(6), (m)(2), and (m)(5)(iii). and at the following locations;

  • 1910.178(a)(2) All new powered industrial trucks acquired and used by an employer shall meet the design and construction requirements for powered industrial trucks established in the “American National Standard for Powered Industrial Trucks, Part II, ANSI B56.1-1969,” which is incorporated by reference as specified in §
  • 1910.6, except for vehicles intended primarily for earth moving or over-the-road hauling.
  • 1910.178(a)(3) Approved trucks shall bear a label or some other identifying mark indicating approval by the testing laboratory. See paragraph (a)(7) of this section and paragraph 405 of “American National Standard for Powered Industrial Trucks, Part II, ANSI B56.1-1969”, which is incorporated by reference in paragraph (a)(2) of this section and which provides that if the powered industrial truck is accepted by a nationally recognized testing laboratory it should be so marked. If you have a gas, diesel or propane fueled forklift then you should look at the following OSHA requirements:
  • 1910.178(f)(1) The storage and handling of liquid fuels such as gasoline and diesel fuel shall be in accordance with NFPA Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code (NFPA No. 30-1969), which is incorporated by reference as specified in Sec. 1910.6.
  • 1910.178(f)(2) The storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gas fuel shall be in accordance with NFPA Storage and Handling of Liquefied Petroleum Gases (NFPA No. 58-1969), which is incorporated by reference as specified in Sec. 1910.6.1910.178(g) OSHA can also enforce issues not contained in the forklift standard if it feels something presents a hazard. This is enforced under the “general duty clause”, under which employers must provide a workplace free from recognized hazards.
In the past, trainers had several options to obtain the standards. The first was to pay for them, but the standards were expensive, updated from time to time and there were many of them. The second option was to violate copyright, and get them from another trainer or company that had purchased them.

We always paid for the standards, but never included them with our trainers’ program due to the expense involved in doing it legally. However, due to co-operative efforts from the ITA and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) the B56 standards are now available free from the Industrial Truck Standards Development Foundation (ITSDF), which is funded by the ITA. Eleven standards are free at www.ITSDF.org.

Whether you are a trainer in the US or not, these are excellent guidelines for forklift safety and contain a tremendous amount of professionally written technical and safety material. Most people will be most interested in the ANSI/ITSDF B56.1 Safety Standard for Low and High Lift Trucks, but there is far more to see.

When you receive this information, please consider incorporating the ANSIs into your forklift safety program.

For more information,

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