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Do You Know How Old Your Tires Really Are? (Jan/Feb-18)
Risk Assessment & Premise Liability Insurance (Nov/Dec-17)
Forklift Safety – You Can Save A Life Today (Sep/Oct-17)
Protect Your Employees from Heat Stress Related Injuries (Jul/Aug-17)
Lockout-Tagout from a Manager’s Perspective (May/Jun-17)
Do Your Employees Really Know How to Use Personal Protective Equipment? (Mar/Apr-17)
OSHA & Lockout/Tagout (Nov/Dec-16)
OSHA Increases Their Penalties Towards Employers (Jul/Aug-16)
Do You Know What Your Experience Modification Rate Is? (May/Jun-16)
Machine Safety (Sep/Oct-15)
Lockout, Tagout & Tryout – Are You in Compliance? (Jul/Aug-15)
Forklift Safety Practices (May/Jun-15)
Using the Right Power Saw to Cut Plastic Materials (Mar/Apr-15)
OSHA & Machine Safeguarding (Jan/Feb-15)
Ergonomics (Sep/Oct-14)
Respiratory Protection . . . Does Your Program Protect? (May/Jun-14)
First Aid Program (Mar/Apr-14)
Working with Composite Materials Safely and Preventing Dermatitis (Jan/Feb-14)
Preventing Winter Slips, Trips and Falls (Nov/Dec-13)
The Globally Harmonized System for Hazard Communication – Are You Ready For It? (Sep/Oct-13)
Safety & New Employee Orientation (Jul/Aug-13)
Liquefied Petroleum Gas Safety (May/Jun-13)
Posting of OSHA Notices (Jan/Feb-13)
Staying Safe This Winter (Nov/Dec-12)
Personal Protection - Storage, Maintenance and Care (Sep/Oct-12)
Machine Safeguarding (Jul/Aug-12)
Is Your Lockout & Tagout Program Working? (May/Jun-12)
Getting Familiar with OSHA (Mar/Apr-12)
Is Your Piping Systems Properly Marked? (Jan/Feb-12)
Accident Prevention, Does Your Company Have An Effective Program? (Nov/Dec-11)
Defining FR – Flame Resistant Fabrics (Jul/Aug-11)
OSHA's Flammable & Combustible Liquids (May/Jun-11)
Safety & Health Program Check-up (Jan/Feb-11)
OSHA Is My Friend (Nov/Dec-10)
OSHA Standard for Control of Hazardous Energy Sources? (Sep/Oct-10)
Lockout/Tagout Program (Jul/Aug-10)
Safe Handling of Compressed Gas Cylinders (May/Jun-10)
What You Should Know about OSHA and Plastic Working Machinery (Mar/Apr-10)
Fasten Those Forklift Seat Belts (Jan/Feb-10)
My Back Hurts (Nov/Dec-09)
Fall Protection Program (Sep/Oct-09)
Accident Prevention & Investigation (Jul/Aug-09)
OSHA & Machine Safeguarding (May/Jun-09)
Carbon Monoxide Hazards (Mar/Apr-09)
OSHA Electrical Safety and Training (Jan/Feb-09)
Free Forklift ANSI Standards (Nov/Dec-08)
Worksite Fire Emergencies (Sep/Oct-08)
Machine Safety (Jul/Aug-08)
Ladder Safety (May/Jun-08)
Is Your Company on OSHA's Hit List?
OSHA Notifies Workplaces with High Injury and Illness Rates (Mar/Apr-08)
Safety Means . . . Never Having to Say You're Sorry (Jan/Feb-08)
Flammables and Combustible Liquids (Nov/Dec-07)
Designing-In Safety NOT Retrofitting Safety (Sep/Oct-07)
Back Safety and Lifting (Jul/Aug-07)
Machine Guarding (May/Jun-07)
Your Hearing Keep it for a Lifetime (Mar/Apr-07)
Light Up the Holidays the Safe Way (Nov/Dec-06)
Would You Risk Your Employee's Life? (Sep/Oct-06)
How to Control Workers' Compensation Costs (Jul/Aug-06)
Compliance with 70E Electrical Standards (May/Jun-06)
OSHA Is on the Move (Mar/Apr-06)
Workplace Violence (Jan/Feb-06)
The Aging Workforce (Nov/Dec-05)
The Safety Paradox (Sep/Oct-05)
Machine Guarding (Jul/Aug-05)
Effective Risk Management (May/Jun-05)
Safety Is Everyone's Business (Mar/Apr-05)
New Year's Resolution Safety (Jan/Feb-05)
Safe Driving (Nov/Dec-04)
Terror In The Skies Revisited (Sep/Oct-04)
How They Got Hurt (Jul/Aug-04)
In-Plant Air Monitoring & Analysis (May/Jun-04)
Safety on the Job and Complying with the Americans With Disabilities Act (Mar/Apr-04)
Link to Article Archive (Jan/Feb-04)
A Supervisor's Duty (Nov/Dec-03)
Machine Safety – Are Your Machines Safe to Operate? (Sep/Oct-03)
Summer is Here (Jul/Aug-03)
Working Safely On Powered Industrial Trucks (Forklifts) (May/Jun-03)
Does Your Safety and Health Workplace Program Contain All of These Elements? (Mar/Apr-03)
Methylene Chloride (Jan/Feb-03)
Safety Signs & Labels - Does Your Facility Comply? (Nov/Dec-02)
Indoor Air Quality (Sep/Oct-02)
When OSHA Arrives (Jul/Aug-02)
Facts About the Occupation Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) (May/Jun-02)
Workplace Fire Safety (Mar/Apr-02)
OSHA 300 Form (Jan/Feb-02)
Preparing for Disaster (Nov/Dec-01)
How Much is a Life Worth? (Sep/Oct-01)
Material Handling Programs (Jul/Aug-01)
It's Up To You To Protect Your Skin (May/Jun-01)
When You’ve Been Handed the Responsibility for Safety (Mar/Apr-01)
A Fresh Look at Machine Safeguarding (Jan/Feb-01)
Safe Work Habits (Nov/Dec-00)
The Importance of Material Safety Data Sheets (Sep/Oct-00)
Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (Jul/Aug-00)
Lockout/Tagout Program (May/Jun-00)
OSHA Violations, Citations and Penalties for 1998 (Mar/Apr-00)
Erogonomics and Machinery Safeguarding (Jan/Feb-00)
General Machine Principles (Nov/Dec-99)
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SAFETY SOLUTIONS: Staying Safe This Winter

We are committed to helping your business implement and maintain safe work practices. Snow and ice bring an increased risk of slips and falls due to slippery sidewalks, parking lots in work areas.

Slips, trips and falls account for about 15% to 20% of all workers compensation costs in cost approximately 300,000 injuries and more than 1500 deaths each year.

Important Tips For Winter Safety

  • Keep adequate supplies of snow and ice removal tools in readily accessible areas.
  • Shovel and apply ice melt as often as necessary to keep working areas clean and dry.
  • Watch for areas where ice tends to form; remove ice accumulations promptly and apply additional ice melt to prevent build-up.
  • Contract with a snow removal company to keep your parking lots clear of snow and ice (make sure that the contracting company’s workers compensation insurance).
  • Apply additional ice melt as needed in employee parking areas.
  • Place high-quality, beveled edge mats in walking areas subject to water or snow accumulation.
  • Change mats regularly to ensure those in place are dry and serviceable.
  • Apply a slip resistant floor treatment in areas that tend to become wet and slippery. Clean and maintain these florists according to the manufacturers specifications.

Train Employees To Do The Following

  • Encourage employees to wear shoes and boots that are specifically designed to provide traction on wet slippery surfaces. Strap-on or slip-on footwear design for winter weather can be worn for additional protection. Use walkways that have been salted or shoveled.
  • Discourage taking shortcuts over piles and in areas where snow and ice removal is not feasible.
  • Test the travel path for slickness by sliding your shoe/boot on it before proceeding area.
  • Takes short steps to maintain your center of balance over your feet.
  • Walk slowly; never run on snow or ice covered services.
  • When entering and/or exiting vehicles, use the vehicle for support. Never jump from vehicles or equipment.
  • When entering the building, remove snow and water from footwear so as not to create wet, slippery conditions and doors.

Winter Driving

Also take care one going to and from work this winter. Have you thought about the car or delivery vehicle that you drive? Every time that you stepped into a vehicle, you face a potential driving hazard. Have you ever thought of your vehicle as a tool? All workers use tools, From office equipment to industrial machinery. Your vehicle is also tool. Whether or not you use a vehicle as part of your work, it, like your other tools must be maintained and you safely.

Before the cold and wet weather sets in here are a few safety checks that should be made:

  • Winter tire maintenance including checking tread depth, tire pressure and the spare tire.
  • Have your battery checked.
  • The cooling system – have the level and concentration of your radiator fluid checked.
  • Windshield wipers and fluid.
  • Oil and filter– some manufacturers recommend using a different weight of oil during the cold months.
  • Engine air filter, rubber hoses and drive belts, check all of your fluid levels (brake, power steering, differential and transmission).
  • Prepare a safety kit including: an ice breaker, tire chains, extra wiper blades/windshield washer fluid, a snow shovel, rock salt and some medium to give you traction on slippery streets.
  • Keep a box of emergency supplies in your trunk such as: extra clothing, blankets, non-perishable snacks, eating utensils, water (both for drinking in radiator refills), a first aid kit, flashlight and battery powered radio with spare batteries, jumper cables and safety flares. Keep a red or white blank to signal for help. It is also a good idea to keep a toolkit in your trunk your around, but it is especially important in the winter.

Tune into the weather before you begin any trip. And don’t get behind the wheel if you have been consuming alcohol or used drugs that can impair your driving. They affect your ability to concentrate and impair reaction time, which is magnified when combined with winter driving conditions.

It is my hope that you and your family have a safe and great holiday season.

For more information, click on the author biography at the top of the page.

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Plastics Distributor® & Fabricator Magazine
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