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PLASTIC PERSPECTIVES
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Plastic Perspectives
Much has been written to explain the globalization movement talked about in recent years. The effect of globalization on our industry has been largely ignored other than the sense that it pervades our thinking and actions, especially in the last 18 months.

The links between nations have been strengthening for a long time. In the 19th century declining shipping costs spurred a dramatic increase in world trade, while improved communication systems facilitated a massive flow of international capital. However, global commerce was disrupted by war and depression until World War II. Then, spurred again by falling transportation and communication costs, global growth resumed with the advent of multinational corporations, although it was held back by the Cold War. Today is different. The global economy opened with the fall of Communism in the late 1980's. The rise of technology forged bridges between nations as real computing and communications costs plummeted by 99% over the past three decades. Today everyone watches CNN and the free flow of goods, capital, ideas and people has mushroomed at the beginning of the 21st century.

Our North American industry is no longer domestic but must include Europe and Asia in its list of prospective customers, along with a growing list of competitors. Telecomputing, FedEx and CNN have made the world smaller - for plastics and for every product and service! Our thinking must change to reflect globalization in both strategic and tactical planning and execution.

The fastest growing sheet product line since Plexiglas® and Lexan® has been Spectar® PETG Copolymer - no accident when one considers the global investment (in money and time) expended by its manufacturer, Eastman Chemical (speaking of globalization). Following is a list of trademarks and labels as well as extruders using them:

Trademarks/Labels for Plastic Sheet Extruded from Spectar Copolymer

Trademark

Extruder/Location

Ampalite

Ampagias, Johannesburg, S. Africa

INIKLEAR TG-70

Paolini S.A.I.C., Buenos Aires, Argentina

Kobe Poly-sheet PETG,

Shin Kobe Electric Machinery Co., Ltd.,

Kobe Poly-sheet PETG-W

Tokyo, Japan

Long-Mai

Beijing ChangKong, Beijing, China

Pacur HG, Pacur UVX

Pacur Extrusions, Oshkosh WI, USA

PETACE

Tsutsunaka, Tokyo, Japan

PETEC

Takiron Co-, Ltd., Osaka, Japan

PLAST,AR G71

Taekwang Chemical Ind., Seoul, Korea

Prime PETG 5700

Primax Plastics Corporation, Richmond IN, USA

Soiarex UV

Spartech Plastics. Cape Girardeau M0, USA

Swepet

ARLA, Borensberg, Sweden

Tough Stuff

Commercial Plastics 8 Supply Corp.,

 

Boca Raton FL, USA

Ultros, Ultros-UV

Lustro Plastics Company, EvanstoN IL, USA

Vectan, Vectan ML

BARLO IRG, Geel, Belgium

Veralite 200, Veralite 200 UV

IPB NY, Waregem, Belgium

Vivak, Vivak UV

Sheffield Plastics, Sheffield MA, USA

 

Axxis, N.V. Tielt, Belgium

Zypet

Southern Plastics Company, Columbia SC, USA

Label

Extruder/Location

PETG, PETg, or PET-G

Allen Extruders, Holland MI USA

 

Plasticos Metalma S.A., Curitaba, Brazil

 

Nudec S.A., Barcelona, Spain

 

Paolini S.A.I.C., Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

Simona AG Kunststoffwerke, Girn, Germanv

A continuing question in our industry has been, "should distributors be concerned about manufacturers selling direct?" The simple answer is YES. However distributors should consider focusing on:

¨ Managing transactions between the manufacturer and end-user, functioning as the "invisible" fulfillment arm of the manufacturer

¨ Managing inventory in the channel to drive down transaction and customer service costs. Long- term, this second role harbors much longer payback potential (courtesy of Tom Gale, Modern Distribution Management).

¨ Cleaning up transactions and inventory planning and scheduling can really help both the manufacturer and distributor concentrate on their core competencies.

For more information, click on the Author Biography link at the top of this page.

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